The JFK Dallas Underground: Of Storm Drains and Bunkers

Storm Drain in Nix Film by Rick Needham

Storm Drain in Nix Film by Rick Needham

I am so curious about the Dallas underground during the 60’s.  No, not the Mafia, gun-running, strip club underground (though that’s interesting too) the REAL underground places around Dallas.  For instance, did you know?

  1. There is a sewer line behind the picket fence (or the stockade fence as Orville Nix called it) that leads to the Trinity River.  You can access it through a grate (see the featured image)
  2. There is an article/document called “A Skeleton Key to the Gemstone File”   by Stephanie Caruana, who for a time collaborated with conspiracy researcher Mae Brussell. The Skeleton Key was distilled from a series of letters by a San Franciscan named Bruce Roberts who, for various reasons, had access to information to which the common citizen was not privy. It details the “secrecy” about the JFK Assassination and the getaway by the snipers through the sewer systems.  Is it true?  I don’t know, but it’s interesting.[i]
  3. This becomes especially interesting when you take into consideration that long time JFK Assassination suspect Johnny Roselli bragged to his prison inmate friend Bill Bonanno, “that he had been the shooter who finished off the badly wounded JFK from a storm drain on Elm Street. JFK had been hit by several bullets in the back and throat and once in the chest, but was still clinging to life until Johnny Roselli finished him off with a near point-blank shot to the right temple as the limo slowed to a crawl for the kill shot.”
  4. Retired US Steel engineer turned JFK assassination researcher, Tom Wilson, deduced that the final, fatal, headshot which entered JFK’s right temple came from the lower right front at a trajectory not possible from the Grassy Knoll area from his photonic imaging studies as presented in A Deeper, Darker Truth. Additionally, a Dallas news reporter named Sam Pate who was in a TV crew car in front of JFK’s limo also noticed what he thought was a puff of smoke arising from the storm drain as he glanced into his rear view mirror during the chaos of the assassination. Mr. Pate would go on to be fired shortly thereafter and later survived two separate car bomb attempts on his life for what he saw that day![ii]
  5. Ed Hoffman stated he “saw a man passing a rifle down into the vertical shaft shortly before the killing.”
  6. The Dallas Civil Defense Emergency Operations Bunker, an underground nuclear bomb proof cellar with special communications equipment, was located under the Health and Science Museum, located at the Dallas State Fairgrounds.[iii] Was this emergency bunker in use on November 22nd, 1963? And if so, did they tape record all of the emergency radio communications? Russ Baker asks the same question and notes that Jack Crichton, who worked with some of those DPD officers in the Pilot Car in the motorcade and assisted in obtaining the interpreter for Marina Oswald on the day of the assassination, was also in charge of this shelter.[iv]  See my previous post here .
  7. Dallas had an extensive underground system  In fact, in the book The Unauthorized History of Dallas, Texas: The Scenic Route Through 150 Years in “Big D” the author writes, “ For two years the restaurant The Blue Front, operated at Field and Commerce under Jack Ruby’s Carousel Club, now at 1310 Elm Street, the Blue Front is an underground restaurant. [v]
  8. Great article by Greg Burnham with pictures here.
  9. Video here of Dallas Tunnels.
  10. Storm drain essay by Michael Parks on JFK Lancer here.

Ready to discuss?  Got lots of fodder for discussion in this one!

 

[i] http://freemasonry.bcy.ca/anti-masonry/gemstone.html

[ii] https://jfkplayersandwitnesses.wordpress.com/tag/johnny-roselli/

[iii] http://www.watermelon-kid.com/history/dallas/timelines/1960s.htm

[iv] http://jfkcountercoup.blogspot.com/2012/07/shenanigans-at-dallas-state-fairgrounds.html

[v] The Unauthorized History of Dallas Texas: The Scenic Route Through 150 Years in “Big D” – Rose-Mary Rumbley, Eakin Press 1991

 

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